Calls for Papers

 

This page includes postings of calls for papers that are sent to the School and that may be of special interest to our Faculty and Members.

MATERIA: New Approaches to Material Text in the Roman World
MATERIA: New Approaches to Material Text in the Roman World is a series of workshops presenting new research on books and other media in antiquity, bringing together scholars from a variety of disciplines—history, literature, epigraphy, papyrology, archeology, manuscript studies, etc. The first two MATERIA meetings, held in 2016 (Columbia University) and 2017 (MIT), pursued a more traditional focus on the book and the literary in order to advance a broader understanding of the history of the book in the Roman world. With MATERIA III, hosted by NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, we hope to extend this discussion further. We invite proposals for papers that consider material text in Greco-Roman antiquity and other ancient civilizations between 500 BCE and 500 CE in terms of, but also beyond, the category of “the book.” What objects would ancient readers and users of text have encountered that looked like books, but weren’t?  What practices did ancients engage in at the periphery of “books”? What media did they use that partook of similar (or different) affordances? Speakers will draw from evidence across the methodological spectrum of ancient studies and related fields to explore the wider world of literate activity, not by way of “literacy” or “the literary,” but by way of practice, technology, and ideology. We are equally interested in new readings of well-known evidence and discussions of evidence that has been neglected, as well as papers that engage in comparative studies of similar practices or problems between different periods or cultures. Our hope is to foster discussion between scholars who work on disparate aspects of ancient material text, reading and writing, in different cultural traditions and who are interested in sharing their expertise with others who approach the topic from different perspectives.  We invite abstracts of no more than 500 words for papers of 30-40 minutes. Abstracts should be submitted to materiaconference@gmail.com by Dec. 20. Organized by Stephanie Ann Frampton (Associate Professor of Literature, MIT), Joseph A. Howley (Associate Professor of Classics, Columbia University), and David M. Ratzan (Head, ISAW Library).

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Transregional Academy, "Spaces of Art. Concepts and Impacts In and Outside Latin America", Mexico City, October 26-November 3, 2019
Together with the Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte Paris (German Centre for Art History) and in cooperation with the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) we invite applications from doctoral and postdoctoral scholars in the field of art history and neighboring disciplines to participate in a Transregional Academy on the theme Spaces of Art. Concepts and Impacts In and Outside Latin America to be held from October 26 till November 3, 2019 at UNAM in Mexico City. The Academies are designed to support innovative research. They offer an opportunity for scholars to build scholarly networks and to discuss their ongoing research projects with peers from different countries and disciplines. Participants will receive grants that cover the costs of travel and accommodation. Please find the announcement below as well as in a PDF format. The deadline for applications is January 31st, 2019. The Academy is part of the strategic cooperation between the Forum Transregionale Studien and the Max Weber Stiftung – Deutsche Geisteswissenschaftliche Institute im Ausland, and is funded by the Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (German Federal Ministry of Education and Research). Deadline: January 31, 2019.

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77th Annual MPSA Conference, April 4-7, 2019, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL
Proposals should be submitted directly to the appropriate section heads of the 2019 Program Committee using the online form. Do not send the same proposal to more than two section heads. Submitting a proposal to two section heads does not increase the chance of having the proposal accepted. If you are offering to serve as a chair or discussant, please indicate your fields of expertise and provide a statement of your interest. Individuals may participate on no more than three panels, poster, JSS, or lightning talk sessions. Participants may give two paper presentations (only one may be single authored), and serve as a chair and/or discussant on a third session. Roundtables are exempt from participation limits. Groups not affiliated with MPSA that wish to sponsor sessions should contact the MPSA (conf@mpsant.org) to arrange this. The 2019 conference will take place over four days, on a Thursday morning through Sunday afternoon schedule of sessions. By submitting a proposal, individuals agree to be available to participate in sessions during any of the four days of the conference. Requests for specific days or times for participation are not accepted, except for reasons related to religious observance or unusual family circumstances. Though MPSA does value teaching, approximately 80% of attendees teach and we cannot schedule around teaching schedules. Special scheduling requests must be submitted to conf@mpsanet.org no later than November 21, 2018. The Midwest Political Science Association reserves the right to accept or reject any proposal received from an individual or individuals desiring to participate in the annual meeting. Click here for dates and deadlines. Click here for more information. Deadline: Friday, Dec. 7, 2018.

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Crucified Saints from Late Antiquity to the Modern Age
Following a panel in January 2018 @ Cantieri dell’Agiografia II edizione, Rome, 18-19 January 2018, organized by AISSCA (Associazione Italiana per lo Studio della Santità, dei Culti e dell’Agiografia), we are preparing an expanded volume on this theme for the society’s series and we welcome proposals for papers.  Proposals should be max. 300 words and be sent to crostini.barbara@gmail.com by 3 January 2019. Approved abstracts will be notified by 15 January. Final drafts (max. 10000 words) should be submitted by 15 March, and will be sent to be peer-reviewed before confirmed acceptance. The language of the volume is English. This volume explores the theme of crucified saints in Christianity in an interdisciplinary and diachronic perspective. From Saint Paphnoutios to Saint Wilgefortis, from the Ten thousand soldiers on Mount Ararat to the Japanese martyrs, crucified saints have been both a local and a global phenomenon. They have inspired and captured the imagination of artists and faithful, but they have also been theologically challenging and at times strongly censured. Unease about direct comparisons to Christ has created divergent paradigms for his apostles, for example, so that traditions about how to represent or describe their manner of death are at times quite mixed (as in the case of Andrew). Conversely, other saints have become ‘crucified’, whether or not this has been their actual means of martyrdom. Exploring the motivations for stressing similarities or differences according to the specific historical circumstances is a driving theme in this volume. Although the punishment of crucifixion is thought obsolete at an early date, recurrence of this form of torture throughout history has caused the theme of crucified saints to spread and revive on several occasions. Through the example of the narratives, artistic interpretations and cultic forms of these saints, whether as individuals or in a group, the following questions could be asked of the evidence: in what way are crucified saints a paradigm for the Christian? To what extent is a form of spiritual crucifixion in imitation of these saints preached or encouraged? Or is it in fact also discouraged? How do they compare with, relate to or are intentionally differentiated from Christ crucified? In what ways is this parallel exploited in their reception? Are there specific historical circumstances that enhance their popularity, for example by the way that they can be exploited as identity markers in multicultural communities? Is there a gender bias with respect to crucified women martyrs and children? What cultural role have crucified saints played in the various historical situations in which their memory has been evoked and their calling interpreted?

Displaying the variety of possible interpretations and uses across a range of examples has the cumulative effect of gathering together an often submerged and to many wholly unfamiliar tradition. Contextualization and critical assessment are expected standards for the contributions.

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Society of Architectural Historians 2020 Annual International Conference ; Seattle, Washington, April 29–May 3
The Society of Architectural Historians will offer a total of 36 paper sessions at its 2020 Annual International Conference in Seattle, Washington. The Society invites its members, including graduate students, independent scholars and representatives of SAH chapters and partner organizations, to chair a session at the conference. As SAH membership is required to chair or present research at the annual conference, non-members who wish to chair a session will be required to join SAH next August 2019 when conference registration opens for Session Chairs and Speakers. Since the principal purpose of the SAH annual conference is to inform attendees of the general state of research in architectural history and related disciplines, session proposals covering every time period and all aspects of the built environment, including landscape and urban history, are encouraged.  Sessions may be theoretical, methodological, thematic, interdisciplinary, pedagogical, revisionist or documentary in premise and ambition and have broadly conceived or more narrowly focused subjects. Sessions that embrace cross-cultural, transnational and/or non-Western topics are particularly welcome. In every case, the subject should be clearly defined in critical and historical terms. Proposals will be selected on the basis of merit and the need to create a well-balanced program. Topics exploring the architecture of Seattle and the greater region are encouraged. Since late submissions cannot be considered, it is recommended that proposals be submitted well before the deadline. Last-minute submissions that fail posting in the online portal or are sent in error via email cannot be considered. 

Session proposals must be submitted online by 11:59 p.m. CST, Tuesday, January 15, 2019. The submission portal will close automatically at this time, and no further proposals will be accepted. Proposals will be reviewed by SAH Conference Chair, Victoria Young, and the SAH Executive Committee.Session proposals must include the following elements:

  1. A session title not longer than 65 characters, including spaces and punctuation
  2. Summary of the subject and the premise in no more than 500 words
  3. Name, professional affiliation (if applicable), address, telephone, and email address (Please ensure that the information you are providing matches, if applicable, an existing SAH profile/membership account to avoid misdirecting communications. If it does not match what SAH has on file, please update your existing member profile to match your current information.)
  4. A current CV (2 pages maximum)

Although the SAH membership is international, the annual conference is conducted in English. Therefore, all session proposals must be submitted in English and, if accepted, conducted in English. Click here for more information

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The European Society for Central Asian Society (ESCAS): ESCAS 2019 Exeter: The Globality of Central Asia
The European Society for Central Asian Society (ESCAS) began in 1985 with a small conference at Utrecht University and has continued since with biennial conferences in a dozen European cities and more recently, in Central Asia too.  Its focus is on building scholarly links and support between Europe and Central Asia. ESCAS seeks to support the study of Central Asia — Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and adjacent regions of the Caucasus, Russia, China, Afghanistan and Iran.  We encourage papers that offer cross-regional or comparative analyses of the Central Asia with its neighboring regions of Asia and Eurasia. Held at the University of Exeter (UK), the theme for the 16th conference is The Globality of Central Asia.  We invite proposals for papers, panels, round-tables and sessions in non-traditional formats covering all aspects of Central Asian Studies across the humanities and social sciences. We particularly encourage proposals which link Central Asia to its global context, historically and contemporaneously. We encourage studies of this geography which engage both territory, space and place. These may include the studies of Central Asia’s migrations and diaspora, its ethnic minority populations, its offshore and extraterritorial spaces, and its place in global and imperial histories. This globality may be visible in archaeologies, cultural studies and pre-modern histories, as well as in modern social, economic and political patterns across borders. Our conference will assess globalizations from below as well as those from above; we therefore invite papers addressing the interpellation of localities and globalities: How are the individuals and communities of Central Asia related to global processes? The committee members can be contacted through the local Conference Administrator, Chee Wong, at escas16@exeter.ac.ukSUBMISSION DEADLINE Extended: Wednesday 14 November, 2018

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14th Century Society / Kalamazoo 2019 (May 9–12)
Calls for papers for:

  • Urban and Rural Economies in the Fourteenth Century
  • Iberia in the Fourteenth Century [co-sponsored with American Academy of Research Historians of Medieval Spain (AARHMS)]
  • Bureaucracy and Document Culture in the Fourteenth Century

Contact: Maya Soifer Irish, Rice Univ, History Dept, 6100 Main MS-42, Houston TX 77005-1827. Phone: (713) 582-3575. Email: maya.s.irish@rice.edu

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Shifting Frontiers in Late Antiquity XII, March 14-17, 2019: “Communal Responses to Local Disaster: Economic, Environmental, Political, Religious”
Abstracts Due October 1, 2018. The Society for Late Antiquity is pleased to announce the thirteenth biennial meeting of Shifting Frontiers in Late Antiquity, to be held at Claremont McKenna College, in Claremont, California. Specialists in art and archaeology, literature and philology, history and religious studies, working on topics from the 3rd to the 8th century CE, are invited to submit paper proposals. Scholars with any related interest are invited to attend. The 2019 meeting will examine the impact of disasters on late-antique communities, including their susceptibility to disaster, the means by which they coped, and factors that increased resilience and facilitated recovery from disasters. In order to foster the thematic breadth and interdisciplinary perspective for which Shifting Frontiers is known, we invite papers concerned with the full range of traumatic events, and also long-term processes, that could distress communities: economic, environmental, political and religious. The aim of this conference is to move beyond the descriptive and stimulate analytical and theoretical approaches to understanding how distressed communities and individuals behaved in the short and long term. Local communities developed daily and seasonal rhythms to mitigate vulnerabilities and fragility. The dread of disaster shaped the late-antique psyche and, in some ways, the cultural landscape of communities. And disasters of various kinds had a wide range of impacts, depending upon severity and the nature of communal resilience. We encourage papers to consider the extent to which the economic, cultural, political or religious resources (or their lack) determined levels of susceptibility, impact, response or resilience. To what extent do late-antique sources acknowledge vulnerability and fragility? What mechanisms created durability and resilience? What were the emotional and intellectual responses to disaster? Does an awareness of the psychological impact of fragility and disaster alter our interpretation of various forms of evidence in Late Antiquity? Proposals for 20-minute presentations should clearly explain the relationship of the paper to the conference theme, describe the evidence to be examined and offer tentative conclusions. Abstracts of no more than 500 words (not including optional bibliography) should be submitted by October 1, 2018. Please submit abstracts as a Word document attached to an email to both Shane Bjornlie (sbjornlie@cmc.edu) and Michelle Berenfeld (michelle_berenfeld@pitzer.edu). Please do not embed proposals in the text of the email. The conference steering committee will review all proposals, starting October 1, with accepted papers receiving notification by November 15. Due to budgetary constraints, bursaries for expenses will not be available, although conference registration fees will be waived for participants presenting papers and for the chairs of sessions. Registration for all other participants will be $100 US. Potential topics include: Economic trauma and its impact (fiscal, commercial, etc.); Environmental distress and disaster relief (volcanos, earthquakes, tsunamis, etc.); Attitudes toward the environment owing to fragility and the potential for disaster; Alimentary and agricultural disasters (famine, drought, interrupted shipping); Urban disasters (fires, rioting, siege); Military disasters on the battlefield; Philosophical and ethical notions of mortality, inevitability and causation connected to disaster; Rhetorical exploitation and literary responses to, or explorations of disaster; Philological footprints in language and idiom related to disaster; Representations of, and psychological responses to disaster in art; Archaeological and architectural evidence of disasters; Religious explanations of disaster and liturgical and cultic responses; Differentiation between sudden, cataclysmic and long-term, slow moving disasters; The memory of specific events. Conference schedule: Initial call for papers: March 1, 2018; Second call for papers: September 1, 2018; Abstracts due: October 1, 2018; Notification of participants: November 15, 2018; Program published on website with conference instructions and open registration for participants not presenting papers: December 1, 2018; Conference convenes: March 14, 2019. Principal conference organizer: Shane Bjornlie (Claremont McKenna College). Conference steering committee: Michelle Berenfeld (Pitzer College), Cavan Concannon (University of Southern California), Beth Digeser (UC Santa Barbara), Nicola Denzey Lewis (Claremont Graduate University), Michele Salzman (UC Riverside), Edward Watts (UC San Diego) and Ken Wolf (Pomona College). Conference details may be found at https://www.cmc.edu/history/shifting-frontiers-in-late-antiquity. If you would like to be removed from this list, please email moniquej@princeton.edu and reference CSLA_Announcements. The request must be sent from the email account you wish to have removed from the listserv. Thank you.

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